applicationContext = Production

In 2018, astrophysicists found the first compelling evidence for a link between high energy cosmic neutrinos and one of the most extreme astrophysical objects, a blazar. This observation was the result of an extensive campaign by the world's largest neutrinos telescope - IceCube at the South Pole - opening a new window to view the universe. The time is now apt to guide the rapidly evolving field of multimessenger astronomy towards dramatic improvements in the sensitivity of the instruments.

A collaboration of Ocean Networks Canada (ONC), the University of Victoria, Canada, the University of Alberta, Canada, the Physics Department of Simon Fraser University, Canada, and the Technical University of Munich (TUM), Germany, is currently exploring possibilities for a future neutrino telescope located in the northern Pacific. 300 kilometers westerly of Victoria, the Cascadia Basin is a promising position for a cubic scale detector with a depth of 2600 meter. In June 2018, the collaboration deployed a first pathfinder experiment (STRAW) which is monitoring the optical conditions at the Cascadian Basin since then. In 2020, the deployment of STRAW-b, a 500 meter long string with ten modules, is scheduled to test hardware and strategies for the planned 10-string array Pacific Ocean Neutrino Explorer (P-ONE).

With the vision of a new large scale neutrino facility in the northern Pacific, a research team led by Prof. Elisa Resconi at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), has designed the pathfinder missions STRAW and STRAW-b. The next step will be the deployment of the Pacific Ocean Neutrino Explorer, a ten-string standalone detector during sea operation season in 2023/24. The ultimate goal is a several cubic-kilometer scale neutrino observatory, the Pacific Ocean Neutrino Experiment. >>

With the vision of a new large scale neutrino facility in the northern Pacific, a research team led by Prof. Elisa Resconi at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), has designed the pathfinder missions STRAW and STRAW-b. The next step will be the deployment of the Pacific Ocean Neutrino Explorer, a ten-string standalone detector during sea operation season in 2023/24. The ultimate goal is a several cubic-kilometer scale neutrino observatory, the Pacific Ocean Neutrino Experiment. >>


Astrophysicists strive to understand where the observed about 100 high-energy neutrinos are coming from. Among the sources that have been proposed are blazars, active galactic nuclei and gamma ray bursts. But since neutrinos are such elusive particles, much more of them need to be detected to solve the puzzle. >>

Astrophysicists strive to understand where the observed about 100 high-energy neutrinos are coming from. Among the sources that have been proposed are blazars, active galactic nuclei and gamma ray bursts. But since neutrinos are such elusive particles, much more of them need to be detected to solve the puzzle. >>

First pathfinder: On 25 June 2018, the two STRAW mooring lines were anchored by the team of Ocean Network Canada in the Pacific at 47º 46' N, 127º 46' W. The goal of STRAW is a systematic investigation of the optical transparency and the ambient background light of the site. >>

First pathfinder: On 25 June 2018, the two STRAW mooring lines were anchored by the team of Ocean Network Canada in the Pacific at 47º 46' N, 127º 46' W. The goal of STRAW is a systematic investigation of the optical transparency and the ambient background light of the site. >>

Second pathfinder: To complete the assessment of the Cascadia basin and experiment with a longer mooring line, STRAW-b has been conceived. The construction is currently finalized at the TUM physics department and deployment is planned for summer 2020. >>

Second pathfinder: To complete the assessment of the Cascadia basin and experiment with a longer mooring line, STRAW-b has been conceived. The construction is currently finalized at the TUM physics department and deployment is planned for summer 2020. >>

The Cascadia Basin in the northern Pacific provides ideal prerequisites for a possible large scale neutrino telescope in the deep sea: At its sea floor at a depth of 2600 meter below sea level, the University of Victoria's Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) operates a variety of instruments connected by undersea cables that provide ample power and communication capability to support interdisciplinary science. >>

The Cascadia Basin in the northern Pacific provides ideal prerequisites for a possible large scale neutrino telescope in the deep sea: At its sea floor at a depth of 2600 meter below sea level, the University of Victoria's Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) operates a variety of instruments connected by undersea cables that provide ample power and communication capability to support interdisciplinary science. >>

(Photos: TUM/Ocean Networks Canada/NASA, ESA, AVO project, Paolo Padovani)